The AAIA regularly hosts events in Sydney and in Athens.

We currently developing an exciting events program for 2021, so please follow us on Facebook or Twitter for updates.

Upcoming Events in Sydney

Our events are frequently advertised on Eventbrite

The Zagora Archaeological Project: new discoveries
Lesley Beaumont, Paul Donnelly, Stavros Paspalas & Hugh Thomas
Thursday 15 April, 2021, 6:30pm AEST
Chau Chak Wing Museum, University of Sydney & streamed via Zoom

The Early Iron Age settlement of Zagora on the Greek island of Andros never ceases to surprise. This presentation is the first of two in which Zagora excavators will present their current findings and insights on this fascinating period which served as the foundation and threshold of the better known Greek Archaic and Classical periods.

Zagora reached its peak in the ninth and eighth centuries BC, a period of critical importance in the development of the Aegean. Unlike most other contemporary settlements, Zagora is exceptionally well preserved since its inhabitants left c. 700 BC and the site remained largely unoccupied thereafter. It is therefore a site that has great potential to inform us on how lives were led at the dawn of the Greek historical period.

Building on the earlier Australian excavations of the 1960s and ‘70s, the research of the current team that recommenced work at the site in 2012 has opened new vistas onto the settlement’s organisation, the craft and production activities which occupied its inhabitants, their agricultural and animal husbandry practices, and their far-ranging maritime networks. The result is a multi-faceted appreciation of a living community.

Presented in conjunction with the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens (AAIA) and the Department of Archaeology. This event will be held in-person at the Nelson Meers Foundation Auditorium, Chau Chak Wing Museum.

You can also join us online for this lecture; register here.

Speakers include;

Dr Lesley Beaumont, Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology at the University of Sydney and Co-director of the Zagora Archaeological Project

Dr Paul Donnelly, Deputy Director of the Chau Chak Wing Museum and Co-director of the Zagora Archaeological Project

Dr Stavros Paspalas, Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, and Co-director of the Zagora Archaeological Project

Dr Hugh Thomas, Senior Research Fellow of Classics and Ancient History at the University of WA and Director Aerial Archaeology in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Projects

Image: Zagora dig hut. Photo: Paul Donnelly

A Succession of Communities: from Kythera to a Victorian goldfield
Richard McNeill (La Trobe University)
Tuesday 20 April 12:30pm Athens/ 7:30pm Sydney/ 10:30am GMT
Online, via Zoom
Register via Eventbrite

The diachronic approach of the APKAS project and the local nature of the Karavas water project encourage a sense of the past as a succession of communities, each leaving their distinct record but united by a reliance on local resources. This reliance, expressed in the infrastructure of industry, community and the household, becomes a part of the cultural and social identity of a community.

In place of the effects of long periods of time, the relatively recent material record of one of the goldfields of mid-19th century Victoria has been rendered cryptic by fire and rapidly changing circumstance. To avoid subjecting this record to our own political and social worldview, we must view it as one as remote from us as the barely visible contours of a Minoan tomb on the hillside opposite Karavas.

The relationship between a community and the means of its survival, evident on the slopes of the Karavas stream catchment, serves as a way of objectively interpreting the society that occupied the otherwise cryptic distribution of features on a goldfield in Victoria Australia.

Richard MacNeill (La Trobe University) was introduced to archaeology while in the Netherlands in 1980. He worked as a crew member for surveys and excavations in the Netherlands and the American southwest for several years before completing study and training as a surveyor and GIS specialist. Richard then worked in the cultural heritage and conservation sectors while assisting field surveys and excavations in Northern Syria (https://leilan.yale.edu/about-project/overview) and Australia and from 2003 assisting the APKAS project. In 2016 Richard, enrolled as a PhD candidate at La Trobe University.

Ancient Greeks on Persians: Wishful thinking in Imagery?
Professor Margaret Miller (University of Sydney)
Tuesday, 4 May, 2021, 6:30pm AEST

The Persians, from the time of their failed attempts to incorporate mainland Greece into their empire, played an important role in Greek thought. Some would say that the Persians even provided the prompt that first created a sense of “Greekness” or “Panhellenism”. It is next to impossible to track shifts in Greek thought about the Persians over the two centuries between imperial foundation by Cyrus the Great and conquest by Alexander of Macedon. Yet the corpus of representations of Persians in Attic vase-painting can give a glimpse into the range of attitudes over time on the part not of the policy-makers but of the ordinary Athenian. On the vases Persians can be portrayed as noble warriors, as majestic kings, but also as somewhat ludicrous. Despite the reality of their continuing military and economic power, Persians could even be made to disappear.

Margaret C. Miller was trained in classics and classical archaeology in Canada, Britain and the USA, and has always been especially interested in the nuances of relations between ancient Greece and West Asia as they can be retrieved through material remains. Her first work focused on the concept of perserie – the fashion for a “Persian” mode in Classical Athens. Years of study of the shifts in cultural expression in the western satrapies of the Persian Empire followed, in pursuit of understanding to what extend Greeks in general or Athenians in particular might really know about their Persian neighbours. This lecture provides an overview of her most recent booking the representation of Persians in Attic arts.

Feature image: Antikenmuseum, Basel BS 480, unattributed red-figure calyx krater, c. 460 B.C.

Wine and the vine: A walk through the beginnings, middle, and end of ancient Greek viticulture
Dr Emlyn Dodd (British School at Rome)

Wednesday 2 June, 2021, 6:30pm AEST

Wine is synonymous with Mediterranean antiquity. It permeated and enveloped ancient cultures over thousands of years. Rivalled only by beer and mead, wine simultaneously transcended social status – drunk by the rich and poor – yet embedded hierarchy through a wide range of desired and undesired qualities. It could be found in domestic, religious, medicinal and economic contexts and had the potential to bring a producer enormous wealth or cause financial ruin. Some have even argued that wine was the medium through which early trade networks expanded, religion and technology was transferred, and population groups migrated.

But where did it come from and how did it get to Greece? How exactly was it made and what was it used for? And how did all of this evolve over the course of ancient Greek (pre)history?

Combining archaeological, historical and scientific evidence, this lecture will take you from the humble beginnings of ancient winemaking in Palaeolithic caves to the lavish Classical Greek symposion, Roman convivium and Early Christian eucharist. We will explore a wide variety of ancient wine types, production methods and uses, and consider how these have changed, or perhaps remained, today.

Emlyn is Assistant Director for Archaeology at the British School at Rome and holds Honorary and Research Affiliate positions at the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, Macquarie University and the Centre for Ancient Cultural Heritage and Environment. He directs his own fieldwork and research projects investigating ancient wine, oil and agriculture in the Greek Cyclades and Italy, and collaborates with others in Rough Cilicia (Turkey) and Mustis (Tunisia). His current fieldwork is funded by the AAIA, Macquarie University, Australian Academy of the Humanities, ASCS and the British School at Athens.

AAIA 40th Anniversary Conference “Mobility and Settlement in the Eastern Mediterranean”

***Postponed: Please check back for details***
University of Sydney, Camperdown Campus

Confirmed key-note speakers to address the conference are:

  • Christina Ioannou (University of Nicosia), on the Connections between Cyprus and the Near East,
  • Antonis Kotsonas (New York University), on Mobility and Interaction in the Northern Aegean,
  • Nicholas Stampolidis (University of Crete), on Crete’s External Contacts between 1000 and 600 BC.

The full program and information for delegates will be available on our website: https://aaia.sydney.edu.au/40th-anniversary-conference/

***EVENT INDEFINITELY POSTPONED DUE TO COVID-19 PANDEMIC***

Professor Alexander Cambitoglou: A celebration of a life
Public memorial in honour of our founding director
Date and precise venue to be confirmed
University of Sydney

Professor Alexander Cambitoglou was a visionary academic who fundamentally shaped the discipline of classical archaeology in Australia. He pioneered public engagement with university research culminating in the creation of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens in 1980, a national organization linking Greece and Australia.

Join us to celebrate his life.

Upcoming Events in Athens

Upcoming events in Athens are advertised via our Facebook page. Please be sure to follow us there for updates.

A Succession of Communities: from Kythera to a Victorian goldfield
Richard McNeill (La Trobe University)
Tuesday 20 April 12:30pm Athens/ 7:30pm Sydney/ 10:30am GMT
Online, via Zoom
Register via Eventbrite

The diachronic approach of the APKAS project and the local nature of the Karavas water project encourage a sense of the past as a succession of communities, each leaving their distinct record but united by a reliance on local resources. This reliance, expressed in the infrastructure of industry, community and the household, becomes a part of the cultural and social identity of a community.

In place of the effects of long periods of time, the relatively recent material record of one of the goldfields of mid-19th century Victoria has been rendered cryptic by fire and rapidly changing circumstance. To avoid subjecting this record to our own political and social worldview, we must view it as one as remote from us as the barely visible contours of a Minoan tomb on the hillside opposite Karavas.

The relationship between a community and the means of its survival, evident on the slopes of the Karavas stream catchment, serves as a way of objectively interpreting the society that occupied the otherwise cryptic distribution of features on a goldfield in Victoria Australia.

Richard MacNeill (La Trobe University) was introduced to archaeology while in the Netherlands in 1980. He worked as a crew member for surveys and excavations in the Netherlands and the American southwest for several years before completing study and training as a surveyor and GIS specialist. Richard then worked in the cultural heritage and conservation sectors while assisting field surveys and excavations in Northern Syria (https://leilan.yale.edu/about-project/overview) and Australia and from 2003 assisting the APKAS project. In 2016 Richard, enrolled as a PhD candidate at La Trobe University.

Past Events

2021 Events

Board games in the ancient greek world: a matter of life and death
Dr Stavros Paspalas
(AAIA Director)
Sunday 11 April, 2021
Chau Chak Wing Museum & online via Zoom

Finds Stories: Can creative biographies write an inclusive history of the Balkans?
Dr. Konstantinos P. Trimmis, (Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Bristol)
Tuesday 16 March, 2021
Online via Zoom

‘Modern’ Women of the Past? Unearthing Gender and Antiquity
An International Conference
5 – 6 March, 2021
Online via Zoom

2020 Events

From Chariot Racing to a Christian Church: Olympia and the last Olympic Games of Late Antiquity
Dr Amelia R. Brown (University of Queensland)
Wednesday 11 November
Online via Zoom (Free)

The Antiquities of Greece and World War II
Dr Stavros Paspalas (Acting Director of the AAIA)
Wednesday, 30 September, 2020
Online via Zoom

A Tale of Five Villages: Glimpses of Bronze Age Cyprus
Emeritus Professor David Frankel (La Trobe University)
Tuesday, 1 September, 2020
Online via Zoom

University of Sydney Classical Archaeology Seminar Program:
‘Mobility of ceramicists in southern Italy’
Dr Ted Robinson (University of Sydney)
Tuesday 5 May, 2020
Online via Zoom

2019 Events

The Poet’s Aesop: appropriating fable
Dr Graeme Miles (University of Tasmania)
Wednesday, 11 September, 2019

AAIA Lecture Series. Ancient Warfare in the Greek and Roman World
Dr Yvonne Inall and Adam Carr
Saturdays, 7-28 September, 2019

Picasso and the Minotaur: A chapter in modern mythmaking
Professor Clemente Marconi (AAIA 2019 Visiting Professor, Institute of Fine Arts, New York)
Wednesday, 28 August, 2019

Toward an Archaeology of Cult in a Greek Colony in the West: new excavations in the main urban sanctuary of Selinunte
Professor Clemente Marconi (AAIA 2019 Visiting Professor, Institute of Fine Arts, New York)
Wednesday, 7 August, 2019

Of Beasts and Men. Iconography and tales in the eighth-century BC Aegean
Dr Stavros Paspalas
Wednesday, 17 April, 2019

The Tomb of the Diver: death, drinking and living it up in the Ancient Greek World
Dr Gillian Shepherd (La Trobe University)
Wednesday, 27 March, 2019

AAIA Guided tour for Athens Friends of the AAIA: of the Pyrgos Vasilissis, Athens
Dr Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory
Sunday 17 March, 2019

Iron Age Site of Zagora

Ancient Andros Revealed: Zagora in Context
Dr Stavros Paspalas
Thursday, 7 March, 2019 (Hobart)
Thursday, 14 March, 2019 (Canberra)

AAIA Workshop, in conjunction with Archaeopolis: “Experiencing the Music of Ancient Greece”
Antonios Ktenas (Ancient Greek music composer, performer and researcher) and Konstantinos Fragkis (National and Kapodistrian University-Hermēs: Music Archaeology Project),
Wednesday, 13 February, 2019

AAIA Guided tour for Athens Friends of the AAIA: “Crete: Emerging Cities” Exhibition (Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art)
Dr Stavros Paspalas (AAIA)
Sunday, 10 February, 2019.

AAIA Lecture Series. Pompeii Revisited: the life and death of a Roman town
Professor Jean-Paul Descœudres
Saturdays, 9 February to 2 March, 2019

AAIA Guided tour for Athens Friends of the AAIA: “Forbidden City” Exhibition (Acropolis Museum)
Dr Stavros Paspalas (AAIA)
Sunday, 27 January, 2019

AAIA, University of Sydney Summer School in Athens
Co-ordinated by Dr Lesley Beaumont (University of Sydney) & Dr Stavros Paspalas (AAIA)
January 4-25, 2019

Contacts

Dr Stavros Paspalas – Director
Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, Room 480, Madsen Building (F09), University of Sydney NSW 2006 Australia
+61 2 9351 4759 +61 (0)2 9351 7693 arts.aaia@sydney.edu.au